[LET’S CHAT] Should Book Reviews Be Subjective or Objective?

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Apparently, I’m on a roll with Let’s Chats about reviewing this month!

I thought a nice blogging-related topic would be talking about book reviews, in some sort of capacity. I talked about book reviews earlier this month (and was unexpectedly successful), but this month, I wanted to talk about HOW you should write book reviews. There’s always been a constant chatter about whether book reviews should be written as a subjective viewpoint or from an objective viewpoint, and even some talk about whether you should recommend a book you personally didn’t like.

I review subjectively. Mainly because I like to keep track of my own thoughts and opinions on a book, and I don’t believe that I should rate a book higher or lower depending on how the general public should receive it, but I know there are some people who think completely different on the subject. So, I thought it’d be nice to present some pros and cons for both – subjective and objective reviews.

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1. People can know your accurate thoughts. I know that when I’m reading a review from a subjective viewpoint, it means I know the reviewer’s thoughts on the book. Not only that, but it means I learn more about the reviewer and their likes and dislikes, so I can recommend books to them I think they might like!

2. If you share the same opinions as that reviewer, it will help your decision. If I know that that reviewer has the same taste in books as I do or I just trust their reviews in general, then I know if I should spend my time and/or money on the book! It’s always nice to have people who have the same viewpoints in your Reader.

3. You can keep track of your own personal thoughts on books. I know it’s much better for me to keep track of my opinions on books if I talk about my feelings and ratings regarding them. How would I be able to know how I felt about books if I only rated and reviewed them from a critical standpoint?

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1. They might be biased. I mean, duh. We’re all susceptible to our favorite tropes, a cool concept, or our favorite authors. I mean, do you think I’d be able to resist giving a Sarah J. Maas thriller novel or a V.E. Schwab magical realism novel five stars, whether they’re flawed or not? I don’t think so. I’m weak. We all are when it comes to our favorite things.

2. People might not trust your opinion. This could link back to point number one. If people know you’re biased against or for a certain author or trope or series, they might not be able to trust your opinion on that specific author or trope or series and turn to a more critical reviewer that will look at all sides.

3. We all see things differently. I mean, duh. Books are a form of art, and art is always open to interpretation, therefore all bookworms will see things differently. I mean, even for a hyped book that seems loved by everyone – like Six of Crows – there are still one-star reviews for it on Goodreads if you go looking out for them. So a book that you love might be the worst book to someone else, and subjective reviews might not help others. Not to mention that some books are more important to others than they would be to you, which might not help others either.

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1. Your reviews aren’t biased. Again, another obvious one. I mentioned this point before earlier, but it’ll definitely help others if you’re not attached to a certain series or author to the point where you can’t give them less than five stars.

2. You can observe the book critically. This is always a good thing! I mean, it’s definitely nice to know that you have the ability to separate your personal feelings from reviewing something since it’s hard for SO MANY people to do that in not just reviewing books, but just all facets of life.

3. It will improve your general skills of taking things apart. I mean, this might not be as applicable to those who are already adults, but if you’re still in school, it’s always nice to develop a sort of skill for being able to observe things from a critical standpoint. I mean, I know I suck at reports in general, so this would be a big additional help.

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1. You might not trust the reviewer. I mean, it’s a bit hard to be able to trust somebody if they say the only reason they like a book is because it’s objectively good. I can name lots of books that I think were good objectively, but I still absolutely hated them and gave them a one star, so it really means nothing to me in the long run.

2. It makes reading less fun. I’ve seen lots of people say that blogging has made them more critical regarding reviews, but it’ll probably be even worse once you start reviewing objectively. You’ll have to look at all the details, read carefully, find quotes backing up evidence, keep track of notes, etc. And, personally, I just read a book because I like reading, damn it! And it wouldn’t be fun to have to keep track of all my thoughts while doing that.

3. You’ll have unrealistic expectations for books. I know that when I often followed snarky reviewers on Goodreads, they often had these crazy high expectations for books sometimes, and I feel like we sometimes do, too. I mean, no matter what, there’s no such thing as an objectively perfect book, and it might ruin the fun of reading and reviewing if you have to examine every little flaw and can’t enjoy a book for what it is.

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And those are just a few of the pros and cons I could think of!

We as book reviewers all have different opinions on how we should review, but I don’t think we should stress about it. Contrary to popular belief, I don’t think people who review books owe anything to anyone – they can like and dislike any book they’d like, can rate a book the way they’d like to, or read a book however they want to – and they shouldn’t stop reviewing just because they don’t do a thing you don’t like (I’ve seen people say this and just…what???). Much like how authors don’t owe readers anything whatsoever; it’s their work at the end of the day.

So, it’s all up to you whether you review subjectively or objectively! Though I personally review subjectively, we are free to review however way we want to!

Let's Chat

Do you review subjectively or objectively? Which type of review do you prefer reading? What are your thoughts about both?

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87 thoughts on “[LET’S CHAT] Should Book Reviews Be Subjective or Objective?

  1. I think my reviews are a little of both. I always try to include my personal thoughts and opinions, but I have recommended books I didn’t enjoy multiple times because I knew it was for personal reasons and that a wider audience would really love it. The only times I don’t recommend someone read a book for themselves is if said book promotes immoral propaganda, such as racism, hateful phobias, or something full of triggers which I will label and warn other readers to be cautious of. Great discussion as always!

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    1. Yeah, same! I recommend books in my Monthly Recs posts that I don’t like, but might be a better fit for someone else – not to mention that I have unpopular opinions a lot of the time, so I tend to be on the opposite side of the majority who will probably enjoy it! πŸ˜‚ Thank you!

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  2. Great post! I review subjectively, but even if I love a book I will mention things that other people might not like. Subjective reviews are often also more fun to read (at least for me), because people show more of their personality. And writing purely objective reviews would also be hard, because people are always biased, even when they are trying not to be.

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    1. Thank you! ❀ Yeah, in terrible at that aspect, and I really should improve on that! πŸ˜‚ I agree; it gives me more of a look into the blogger for me as well! Yeah, I don’t think people can be completely objective in any aspect of life; it’s just too hard and we’re just human, after all! πŸ˜„

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  3. I personally prefer subjective reviews. It just so nice to see someone fangirl over a book they love and are passionate about. Plus I honestly like to see people’s thoughts and opinions more then the “objective” part in a review, though sometimes I do like a good critical discussion. To have a bit of both is best I think but everybody has a different style of reviewing and they should do what they like the most. (also this is my first time actually commenting but i absolutely love your blog!)

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    1. Yes, I agree! I love seeing someone rave about a book they love and rant about a book they didn’t love. It’s nice seeing someone’s thoughts and opinions. Yeah, I think a bit of both is definitely a good idea. And, thank you so much; I’m glad you do! ❀

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  4. I try to do both? I think it’s impossible to be completely objective but when I’m, for example, reviewing a MG book I try to appreciate it how someone of that age might, otherwise you might be overly critical of a book that just wasn’t written for you.

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    1. Yeah, I think it’s hard to be completely objective because reading is so personal for everyone out there! And age group is definitely an important factor! As a teenager, I get frustrated when adult reviewers rate a book low for an annoying, dumb heroine, mainly because teenagers make dumb decisions based off of emotions sometimes! So, I totally get that! πŸ˜„

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  5. We sometimes rate our fave books/authors (like Throne of Glass) lower as we know there are flaws but you still love it anyways and because it gets better throughout the series! πŸ˜ŠπŸ˜ƒπŸ˜ƒ

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    1. Yeah, I love SJM’s books as well, but, objectively, Throne of Glass and A Court of Thorns and Roses should be much lower ratings for me considering how much better the sequels are and how they definitely have their faults – but I still rated the both of them four stars! There’s the bias! πŸ˜‚

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      1. Yes! SJMaas first books in a series usually have flaws but the second book totally makes up for it and so on! For her – we don’t go lower than a 3! As series rating it probs would be 5!πŸ€“πŸ˜‰

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  6. I think my reviews tend to have both subjective and objective elements to them. I definitely try to avoid being too objective and sounding like an emotionless robot, but I also try to avoid only focusing on my emotional reaction to a book.
    Great post! πŸ™‚

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    1. Yes, that sounds like a good balance! I’m much better at saying that there were good parts of a book I didn’t like than talking about the negative points of a book I loved (which totally shows my bias whoops). Thank you! ❀

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  7. I think my reviews are really subjective. I talk about what I like or hate, and if it was a really great book, I often fangirl and squeal and scream. XD

    However, even though the fangirling could be hard to read, I enjoy reading it in reviews more than reading a review that’s just restating the plot, characters, and setting. (And those reviews are usually subjective.)

    I think I liked reading subjective reviews more because while they may be biased, I get a good idea of what the reviewer liked and/or disliked. From an objective viewpoint, I don’t get those feelings, and I feel like that’s how I connect to the review/reviewer.

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    1. Haha, I feel the same way! If I love a book, my review is a hot mess of me fangirling and repeating myself over and over again. I can’t help getting excited about books! πŸ˜‚

      I agree! I enjoy reading a blogger’s thoughts on all aspects of a book in a subjective viewpoint, and it does help me know what the liked and didn’t like. I also feel like I connect more to a person on their posts, which is probably why I prefer those who have a stand-out blogging voice! πŸ˜„

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  8. I try to include a little of both in my reviews, but I am probably biased because of my enjoyment of them. I review because it is fun and it is mostly for myself to keep my thoughts down on a book I have read. Honestly, I don’t see how there can be a “standard” for reviewing. Like, come on people, everyone is different and they can do different things. πŸ˜‚ Just let people be themselves.
    I prefer objective over subjective reviews. It just feels more real and more human. Like you said, if someone likes the same book as me, there is a higher chance that I will read it. For example: I was hesitant to start reading Six of Crows until you made that challenge saying how amazing it is. πŸ˜‚πŸ‘ So thanks!
    Great post!

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    1. Same; I rate and enjoy books based off of my enjoyment of them, and that’s fine with me! Yeah, I don’t get how there can be a standard either – if you’re a blogger, you’re doing it for fun, so I don’t believe that reviewing should be any different. Yeah; once you finish it and if you love it, YOU MUST TELL ME! Maybe we could buddy-read Crooked Kingdom since I’m SO BEHIND. πŸ˜‚

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      1. Yeah, exactly! Like, everyone hated. the Cursed Child when it came out, but I loved it and gave I five stars. I didn’t care about the flaws; it felt magical and wonderful to me! πŸ˜„ And, yeah! ❀

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      2. I haven’t even read it but all I have heard it hate for it. ;;; Everyone says it is a disgrace, but they do not understand that J.K Rowling didn’t write most of it if any. Why can’t they just appreciate it like people appreciate fanfiction? XD
        Awesome! I have never had a book buddy, but that sounds awesome!

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      3. Yeah, I didn’t mind! I accepted it for what it was, and then cried a little at the end. I’M WEAK. And used to being the unpopular opinion, anyway, so I wasn’t really surprised! πŸ˜‚

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  9. Great post! I try very hard to put in a little of both, especially if I don’t like a book. I’ll state that I didn’t like it but find the pieces that I know other readers would enjoy. It’s hard to not add my personal opinions to reviews because reading is such a person process for me.

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    1. Yeah, I think reading is a very personal experience depending on the person, which is what makes reviewing objectively quite difficult. I do the same thing, since I know everyone likes different books, so who knows; what I hated might be another person’s new favorite! πŸ˜„

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  10. I definitely think there’s a need for both. It helps people see the full spectrum of a book. I myself am a subjective reviewer. I read for the purpose of an emotional or thoughtful experience so that’s what i talk about. If I feel strongly about something (a writing style or something I find problematic) I still relate it to my own personal thoughts and emotions. And I like reading subjective reviews more than anything because they give me a more personal insight to both the book and the reviewer, like you said. Objective reviews are often one sided and can be harsh as times even if it’s not their intention

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    1. Yes, exactly! Like, even if someone sees something as problematic, that’s still subjective and based off of your opinions – not everyone feels that way about a book. And, yeah, critical reviews can be harsh sometimes, and lots of books are just really fun! I don’t think that every book has to unlock some secret of life or anything! πŸ˜‚

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      1. You are officially my favourite person right now!! I’ve been feeling that a lot lately. Like people are looking into a book too deeply to try and find some hidden agenda or make something “problematic” (I really don’t like that word by the way πŸ˜‚) that isn’t really there. I respect someone that can read a book and think deeply on it, however, reading is supposed to be fun. It should take you on an adventure, introduce you to new people and maybe even teach you something. I feel like sometimes those who objectively read miss that point.

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      2. Haha, same; the word has been so overused at this point that it’s hard to take seriously, to be honest! πŸ˜‚ Yeah, I feel like some people forget that reading is a hobby just like any other, and having fun with it isn’t a bad thing! πŸ˜„

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  11. My reviews are mainly subjective because it’s MY book review (what’s the point of writing a review if it’s not your opinion). I feel like it’s so much better. However, if I hated a ‘good’ book (objectively) then at the end, I’ll say something like ‘The book wasn’t for ME but I understand why people like it’ because that has happened for loads of books. I don’t like objective reviews personally because I don’t get to see what the reader ACTUALLy thought.

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    1. Yeah, same! I get that, because I tend to have a lot of unpopular opinions about books and series that everyone seems to love, and I just don’t get it sometimes, but then other times, I know it’s just a “me” thing. And, yeah, I prefer seeing the blogger’s point of view over everything! πŸ˜„

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  12. It’s so funny you posted this subject because it’s something I’ve been thinking a lot about lately and wanted to share my own thoughts on it on my blog (but haven’t yet). I’ve seen a few posts now about how reviews should be objective. I totally understand the points people make with that, but I just don’t want to. I started a blog for me, I wanted to talk about the books I read – my thoughts on them, whether I liked it or not – and hopefully, someone will relate. So my reviews are pretty subjective. I don’t feel right rating a book higher because other people might enjoy it – I didn’t read the book to find out if other people will like it. Does that make sense? hahah Either way, both types of reviews are totally helpful but I just prefer subjective ones for myself!

    Molly @ Molly’s Book Nook

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    1. Yeah, I was inspired to write this because I saw on someone else’s blog that they rated a book five stars even though they hated it because it was important…which I get why they would do it, but I just can’t do it! I feel like I’m being dishonest to people, but then again, that’s just me! πŸ˜„ Yeah, I feel that! I read, review, and rate books on how I enjoyed them, not if I think it’s good for others, but it’s great for those who do use it that way! πŸ˜„

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  13. I guess I’m a subjective Reviewer, And I see your point both types of reviews have pros and cons, I guess it comes down to what you want to put out there and who you want to reach with it, I know it’s sometimes hard to give a bad review for an author you love but to be honest in my case if the book was that bad I probably won’t review it (That’s why IΒ΄m a little hesitant with the Arcs thing at least for now I don’t have a commitment to review) I’m still growing my blog and all in due time I guess.

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    1. Yeah, it’s true! There’s definitely pros and cons for both, but it really comes down to what you want to do. Yeah, I feel like that when I give bad reviews to debut authors; it makes me feel terrible. 😝 Haha, yeah; I don’t even think I have a reviewing style and I’ve been blogging for five months, so definitely all in due time! πŸ˜‚

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  14. I would think mine are subjective for the most part as I try to write in a more personal, conversational way. That said, I can totally recommend a book on it’s merits for other people, even if it’s not to my taste.

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    1. Yeah, that makes sense! Even if my reviews are somewhat organized, pretty much all of them are subjective! I do the same thing! I’ll recommend books I don’t like in my Monthly Recs posts just because I know different things work for different people! πŸ˜„

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  15. I agree with those who try to do both, but I do tend to be more subjective in my reviews. I like your list of pros and cons – you put into words what I’ve been thinking. If I really don’t like a book, I wouldn’t necessarily recommend it, but I would mention that some people might like it. My opinion is just that – my opinion!

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    1. Oh, I’m glad you liked the pros and cons! I’ve been doing them a lot lately. πŸ˜‚ Yes, I do the same thing! I don’t want to shame someone into never reading a book, since it’s my opinion after all, like you said! I certainly don’t dictate the reading world! πŸ˜„

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  16. I feel like my reviews tend to be both. It’s important for me to voice my opinion, but at the same time, it’s also important for me to be critical of things when I need to be. I’ve read a few books this year that had problematic content in them and was very critical of those things in my reviews.

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      1. You shouldn’t say that you suck at it, be more positive. Think of it this way, your review style is unique to you and there’s always room to grow as a reviewer too.

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  17. I try to review both subjectively and objectively. I start with what I see as objective stuff – whether the writing was good, how the plot came across, and how the story itself was executed as a whole. But I don’t really see the value in a “fully objective” review – and I don’t think they actually exist. We all have different views, and what’s the point of writing anything at all if there isn’t a little of you in there?

    When it comes to reviews, I tend to call attention to anything that is strictly my opinion. For instance, I feel that pretty much every book would be better if it was more diverse and even more queer. But I also recognize that, when it comes to Queering Everything, that’s my opinion and not objective – so I call myself out for that.

    Even with a fully subjective review, a discerning reader of that review can decide for themselves whether or not to take your words at face value. If someone says, for example, “this book had my favorite trope, love triangles” then I can decide for myself if I would enjoy that book. But if a reviewer is completely objective, there’s less for the reader of that review to pull from in deciding whether or not to read the book.

    Ultimately, I think it’s a balancing act. But maybe that’s just me πŸ˜‰

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    1. Yeah, I review different sections based off of what genre the book is from – for instance, I don’t care about world-building in a romance novel, but if I’m reading fantasy, it plays a bigger part – which is why a five star fantasy isn’t the same as a five star romance. Obviously. πŸ˜‚ And, yeah, that’s probably true! Like, are professional reviewers objective? I don’t even know!

      I feel that! I feel like most YA thrillers would greatly improve if romance didn’t play a part in it. It’s one of my biggest gripes. BUT…that’s just me. Someone else out there probably loves it!

      That makes sense! I know I’ve seen some people say they read negative reviews of books because what they say they hate, they might love, which is really interesting, since I rarely do that! But it does make sense, I guess?

      Haha, definitely not the only one! πŸ˜‚

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  18. This is such a great post. I’ve been thinking about this a lot recently. I think it’s good to have a bit of a mix of both and that’s what I try to do in my own reviews. That way you can see what the reviewer personally thought of the book (and the reviewer can keep track of their own opinions – like you, this is one of the reasons I like reviewing books), but you can also get a sense of whether the book is actually well-written or not. I know personally I always feel bad if I give a negative review because I didn’t like the book even though the book is actually well-written, especially if it’s an indie/self-published book, so if that’s the case, I always mention in my review that the book is objectively fine, but just something that didn’t really connect with me personally. Ultimately, it’s a really hard balancing act, haha.

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    1. Thank you, Kourtni! πŸ˜„ Yes, that’s definitely true! I mean, even in some of my favorites, I can see their faults – I just choose to overlook them because I love them so much! πŸ˜‚ Oh, yeah, for me, I feel worse about not liking a book if it’s from a debut author. Like, I want them to do well, and get more books picked up by them, but I still want to be honest about it! It sucks sometimes! 😝

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  19. This is a great discussion! My reviews are definitely subjective but I always try to include something like “even though this book wasn’t for me, if you like (so and so) then you may really enjoy it” … or try to point out areas that may not be generally received well.

    For the most part I prefer reading subjective reviews. I actually really enjoy it when people go on rants or raves. Its a lot of fun to read. However every once in a while there is a mostly objective review that really makes me want to read a book.

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    1. Thank you! And, yes, same! Even when I don’t like a book, I still say, “It wasn’t for me, but others might enjoy it!” I tend to sometimes be the unpopular opinion, so maybe that’s why! πŸ˜‚

      Yes, me too! I found some funny reviews on Goodreads about a book I was disappointed by, and it was really nice to see others ranting about it! It definitely creates a spirit of being kindred, I guess?

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  20. What an important topic! I think no matter how objective you can be, there will always be some subjective points. I try my best to do a bit of both. Even if I don’t like a book, I will rate it high if it’s an overall well done novel. But I am the first to admit that some of my reviews have personal bias – not really by genre but how the story lines up. I’m lucky that my roommate read a few of mine and edited them, allowing me to see how some of my opinions are too subjective. I think it really depends on what kind of reviewer you want to be. I thought a blend of both was the easy way ha-ha! Great post!

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    1. Yeah, definitely! Like, if I was reading a book featuring small town secrets (which are my favorite things of ever), even if I was objectively reviewing it, I’d probably slip up and say something like, “I love small town settings, so I wasn’t surprised to like this one.” I’m weak. πŸ˜‚ Yeah, I guess it does depend on what type of reviewer you want to be from the get-go, whether it’s being subjective or objective, or something silly like wanting all your reviews to include gifs! Thank you! ❀

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  21. When it comes to reviews I will read any if it’s a book I’m interested in reading myself, or a book I’ve read and loved. When it comes to my own reviews I think I must be a little bit of both, maybe more subjective than objective. At the end of the day though all my reviews are my own opinions, every book I recommend is my own opinion too, I know people aren’t always going to like the same books I do or even agree with all the points I make in my review but I guess like you said it’s a good way to get my thoughts across about a book I’ve read, be it one I enjoyed or one I didn’t enjoy as much.
    Great discussion Mikaela, you really are on a roll when it comes to review discussions! πŸ˜€

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    1. Ooh, I think I usually read a review if I’m anticipating the book! Usually I’ll only check out a couple before I feel like I don’t need to read anymore about it sometimes! πŸ˜‚

      That’s very true! I’m going to have a whole Let’s Chat about recommending books for later this year, but I get terrified that someone will hate my recommendation. Like, it’ll crush me on the inside even when I know everyone has different opinions! But, yes, it’s a fantastic way of gathering all the thoughts I had while reading the book and actually organizing them!

      Thank you so much! I think my Let’s Chats for the next months will be all about blogging though, so I guess this is right on time! πŸ˜‚

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      1. Yeah, I guess reading too many reviews for you anticipated books can spoil it a little. Even if there aren’t spoilers you know?
        I feel the same when it comes to book recommendations. It’s always worrying when you essentially gush over a book so much that the other person won’t enjoy it. Luckily I think those times are few and far between. πŸ™‚
        That’s all right, and in that case I can’t wait to see your future Let’s Chat posts! πŸ˜€

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    1. That’s very true! I also like knowing what the blogger thinks about the book for themselves without a critical stand-point, since I also think that you can do that without being objective! πŸ˜„

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  22. Ahhhh I always look forward to reading your posts because they are sooo interesting! Usually I think I put my subjective opinion, but I note how well it has been written in the review, etc.. (if it’s a bad review)

    I think my reviews have both elements but I like to think they’re more.. subjective?? Although I would totally call out problematic things if I enjoyed then I enjoyed it. great post!!

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    1. Aw, thank you so much, Julianna! ❀ Yeah, I think I usually end up injecting my subjective opinion somewhere in there because I’m weak! I’m terrible at mentioning flaws in the things I love because I love them!

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  23. Great post! πŸ˜ƒ
    I personally don’t really see the point of objective reviewing. If your review is not personal, why bother? Everyone is gonna say the same thing anyway if it’s objective.
    I occasionally review things for my university magazine, and when I reviewed an album recently, the editor decided to give it 4 stars instead of my suggested 5, because most people had given it 3-4 stars. I find that kind of ridiculous. What’s the point of my review if it’s just based on the general opinion?

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    1. Thank you! πŸ˜„

      And that definitely makes sense! It wouldn’t really make reviews original anymore if we all agreed and said “This book is good, and this book is bad, and everyone should think the same way.”

      And, yeah, that sucks! I know I’m the unpopular opinion on things A LOT – not just in books, but also in real life as well – and I wouldn’t be me if I just caved to how everyone else feels.

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  24. In order to “objectively” review a piece of art, you have to be judging it against some standard. The obvious, and obviously problematic, question there is “who decides the standard?” Some people think Jackson Pollack “couldn’t paint,” but he was an excellent draftsman before he went abstract. Other people acknowledge Salvador Dali was a brilliant draftsman but wasted his talent on ridiculous subject matter. Who watches the watchman? It’s art. There really is nothing but one’s personal impression at the end of the day.

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    1. Ooh, that’s very true; I never thought of that! πŸ˜„ Even some times when I rate books, I’ll be like, “But this five-star fantasy isn’t as amazing as this five-star fantasy, so why am I rating them the same way?” I guess it goes along with the comparison game, in a way.

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  25. Both certainly have their place.
    Personally, I like to see subjective book reviews when they’re positive reviews. It’s fun and energizing to see somebody gush love for something.
    But when it’s a negative review, I prefer to see something a bit more objective. You didn’t like it? Why not? I find specifics very interesting when people are giving a negative review.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh, that’s super interesting; I’ve never thought it when it comes to positive and negative reviews! I think I’m subjective with both – even when I talk about things I hated in a book I rated one-star, it’s just the things I hate, which anyone else could absolutely love! But you definitely make great points! πŸ˜„

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      1. I suppose a case could be made for being more objective when you’re rating something outside of your typical genres. If I don’t typically review paranormal romances, but then decide to review one for whatever reason, I think it is better practice to rate a bit more objectively, rather than just running with whatever bias you might have against the genre.
        But for sure, subjective reviews are more fun to read and write. Great past topic, Mikaela!

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      2. That’s very true! I don’t read romance a lot, and it’s not my thing, but when I do once in a while, I’m way more lenient than I am when I rate a thriller novel, which I’ve read SO MANY OF THEM that I know when something is done well and something isn’t done well at all. I know there are times where I’ll think a thriller or fantasy novel is TERRIBLE…but someone else who rarely reads those types of books will rate said novel that I think is terrible with 5 stars because they’re not tired of the tropes yet. XD Thank you so much! πŸ˜€

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  26. I’m not sure I believe objective reviews are even possible. I haven’t ready even a hundredth of a percent of all literature — my point of reference is unique, so why aim for an objective perspective? What I choose to read and how I feel about it is completely personal.

    I do try to aim for personal consistency — even if I don’t have a point of reference for books on the whole, I can have a point of reference for my own tastes and perspectives. When I can’t decide how to rate a book, I’ll often compare scores of books I’ve read in the past as a reference point.

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    1. Yeah, I definitely thinks it’s hard to have a completely objective review, since I think in the end, the way you feel about something will influence the objectively, if that makes sense?

      Yeah, I agree with that! I know for sure there are some books I love where I don’t mind if they use a trope I hate just because it was so good, in my opinion, and sometimes I’ll go easier on a book I don’t like if an element of the book was really good. It all depends! πŸ˜„

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  27. It’s tricky, I try to be fair and objective. I always think of the author who has slaved over it! I don’t really recommend at all unless I really loved it πŸ˜πŸ“š I do love to read other people’s reviews where the claws come out or people really rave about it though! Its great to see people really passionate about books! It’s just not my style because I know I’d go too far! πŸ’€

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